Photo of senior leaders from UMass Medical School and UMass Memorial Health Care donned gloves and pitched in at the Great Brook Valley Health Center on the 2009 Day of Caring, sponsored by United Way of Central Massachusetts

Service to the Commonwealth

The spirit of public service lies at the heart of the University of Massachusetts experience

Above right: Senior leaders from UMass Medical School and UMass Memorial Health Care donned gloves and pitched in at the Great Brook Valley Health Center on the 2009 Day of Caring, sponsored by United Way of Central Massachusetts

Michael F. Collins, M.D. 
Chancellor, UMass Medical School; Senior Vice President for Health Sciences

“Service to the Commonwealth is the cornerstone of our mission. It is what guides and inspires us as we educate physicians and nurses to care for our neighbors; as we develop health policy that saves taxpayers millions of dollars through innovation; and as we invest in research that preserves Massachusetts’ status as a global life-sciences leader.”

Michael F. Collins, M.D.
Chancellor, UMass Medical School;
Senior Vice President for Health Sciences

Members of the UMass community contribute thousands of hours annually to the greater global community as well as our local neighborhoods, cities, and towns.

Commonwealth Medicine solving long-term care puzzle

For decades, Medicaid and Medicare have provided a health care safety net to millions of Americans in need of acute care. Long-term care (LTC), however, has been more complicated to predict, structure, and provide consistently. Until recently, it has been on the back burner of the national policy agenda. As the U.S. population lives longer, elders and those with disabilities need more comprehensive long-term medical and social services and support. Now LTC has become a major focal point in the ongoing national health care debate.

In late 2008, Massachusetts Governor Deval L. Patrick’s administration unveiled its Community First Olmstead Plan, with the state’s Executive Office of Health and Human Services (EOHHS) and Executive Office of Elder Affairs. Its goal is to ensure that elders and people with disabilities in Massachusetts have access to opportunities and support that allow them to live with dignity and as much independence as possible.

Under this plan, EOHHS, MassHealth (Massachusetts Medicaid), and Elder Affairs leadership convened the Massachusetts Long-Term Care Financing Advisory Committee, composed of 24 public and private health care stakeholders and experts. The committee’s charge was to identify strategic options for a sustainable mix of private and public LTC funding mechanisms. EOHHS, MassHealth, and Elder Affairs called upon Commonwealth Medicine, the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s nonprofit consulting and service organization, to conduct the most comprehensive review of LTC financing to date.

Photo of Commonwealth Medicine and the Massachusetts LTC Financing Advisory Committee identify future financing for elders and individuals with disabilities (Photo credit: Robert Carlin Photography)

Above (L-R): Commonwealth Medicine and the Massachusetts LTC Financing Advisory Committee identify future financing for elders and individuals with disabilities (Photo credit: Robert Carlin Photography)

Both at the table and behind the scenes, Commonwealth Medicine has made vital contributions to the committee’s work. Substantive analytic support comes from its Center for Health Law and Economics (CHLE), with expertise from its Office of Long-Term Support Studies, which administers federally funded Community First and Systems Transformation grants in Massachusetts. The two groups prepared a policy development framework and background materials. CHLE’s explanation of Medicaid’s complicated eligibility rules laid the foundation for meaningful discussion, and when the committee delved into the public LTC financing system, CHLE guided the committee through available options.

“We are proud to support the Commonwealth,” said Michael F. Collins, M.D., Chancellor of UMass Medical School. “The involvement with the LTC Financing Advisory Committee is reflective of the long-standing, productive partnership between Commonwealth Medicine and the state.”

The University of Massachusetts is a vital partner in the lives of all residents of the Commonwealth.

This collaboration between the University and our greater society, through which goals and objectives are jointly developed, and expertise and resources are shared, ensures that every resident has the opportunity to benefit from the education provided by the University and the new knowledge created here.

University research is springing from the labs and classrooms of our campuses to reach people in every corner of the state. Over the past year, University research has yielded dozens of start-up companies that require Massachusetts workers to operate. These new companies give way to industry clusters that feed the local economy.

In addition to its core mission, members of the UMass community contribute thousands of hours annually to the greater global community as well as our local neighborhoods, cities, and towns. These service projects provide benefits to the community while enriching our society.

Projects run the gamut, from a reading enrichment program for English-as-a- second-language school children run by the UMass Lowell basketball team, to UMass Boston’s Camp Shriver, a camp that brings together students with and without intellectual disabilities to engage in athletic activities.

Research, teaching, and serving the greater good are hallmarks of a University of Massachusetts education. We are honored to acknowledge the wealth of public service provided by our star faculty members.

University of Massachusetts President Jack M. Wilson presented the 2009 President’s Public Service Awards to five worthy faculty members who provide exemplary public service to the Commonwealth. Since 1997, these awards have been given annually to faculty members of UMass Amherst, Boston, Dartmouth, Lowell, and Medical School.

Our hard-working faculty members not only educate our students, they also contribute much to our communities, our Commonwealth, and our world.

“The energy one gets from even the simplest acts of giving is powerful motivation,” says Professor Matthew Roy, UMass Dartmouth’s recipient.

This year’s honorees are:

Mari Castaneda, Ph.D.
Photo of Mari Castaneda, Ph.D.Associate Professor of Communications, UMass Amherst
Professor Castaneda is recognized for her role in the development of university-community partnerships that benefit the growing Latino community of Holyoke, MA, in areas of education, economic development, and housing. She is an ardent and energetic advocate whose work with the Community Outreach Partnership Center (COPC) and Student Bridges demonstrates the strength of her commitment to building reciprocal relationships that dovetail with her work in media, cultural production, policy, and pedagogy.

David G. Terkla, Ph.D.
Photo of David G. Terkla, Ph.D.Professor of Economics and Environmental, Earth, and Ocean Sciences, UMass Boston
Professor Terkla is recognized for the enormous impact he has made on Greater Boston and the Commonwealth through his work identifying new industry clusters and their influences on the Massachusetts economy, his research on transportation planning that helped to initiate significant legislative and policy changes, and his work in fisheries and ocean management. Dr. Terkla has established a highly respected body of work that is recognized by academics, practitioners, politicians, and leaders.

Matthew Roy, Ph.D.
Photo of Matthew Roy, Ph.D.Assistant Provost, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement, School of Education, Public Policy, and Civic Engagement, UMass Dartmouth
Professor Roy is recognized for leading a five-campus collaboration to increase the breadth and depth of community service learning performed by University of Massachusetts students. He is also the architect of the Leadership for Educational Attainment Developed through Service (LEADS) program, designed to increase the civic engagement and leadership skills of Fall River and New Bedford public school students.

Kay Doyle, Ph.D.
Photo of Kay Doyle, Ph.D.Professor, Program Director and Department Chair of Clinical and Nutritional Sciences, UMass Lowell
Professor Doyle is a passionate advocate who has demonstrated a long-standing dedication to enhancing lives through developing strong partnerships between science and the people who are influenced by it. As a scientist and global leader within the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), she participates in the certification of medical laboratory professionals in this country and is establishing standards for laboratory medicine across the world. Dr. Doyle’s service and commitment know no boundaries.

Linda D. Sagor, M.D., M.P.H.
Photo of Linda D. Sagor, M.D., M.P.H.Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Division Director of General Pediatrics, UMass Medical School
Professor Sagor, a compassionate pediatrician and ardent advocate for children, is one of Central Massachusetts’ leading physicians. She is committed to the care and welfare of children on multiple levels, from promoting school breakfast programs to teaching medical students about the importance of primary care. Dr. Sagor founded and directs FaCES, the Foster Children Evaluation Services Clinic, providing health assessments to facilitate excellent medical care for these vulnerable children.